Marginalia — publishing

What do readers want?

Australian publishing book industry on reading Publishing

What do readers want?

‘Historically speaking,’ said one of the visiting publishers at the Australia Council’s 2016 publishing scheme, ‘Koreans read for educational purposes. Only recently have we started reading for pleasure. This is why non-fiction books are very big in our market: business books, science…but literary fiction is starting to sell very well.’

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Forever in print, or: Notes on printing and publishing at the time of the Bard

Martin Luther Printing Publishing Shakespeare Shakespeare400

Forever in print, or: Notes on printing and publishing at the time of the Bard

It is difficult to overstate Shakespeare’s influence on language and popular culture. After a while it becomes hard to tune him out; he’s on screen, in political speeches, in marketing campaigns, on The Simpsons. You try to escape, slither back into your pre-Shakespearean world for a moment; huddle up in front of a Disney film. Then someone pipes up, ‘Did you know The Lion King is based on Hamlet?’ This man, it seems, single-handedly changed the course of Western popular imagination. He gave us new words with which to express ourselves; characters that have proven immortal; thoughts on love and death that remain relevant.

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From publisher to writer: some answers

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 Words by Charlotte Guest, Publishing Officer at UWA Publishing


 Every week, we receive calls and emails asking a particular set of questions that revolve around one central issue: how does a first time writer get published?

Time constraints mean that we cannot always answer these questions as fully as we’d like, so to satisfy both interlocutors (the asker and the asked) I’d like to dedicate this post to answering the most commonly asked questions, as well as providing some tips to aid your submission before it even gets read.

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Reading between the lines: notes on publishing now

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Words by Charlotte Guest, Publishing Officer at UWA Publishing


As Sean Kelly wrote in a recent article for The Monthly, our public debate and mainstream media coverage has become increasingly simplistic. We have misplaced the tools for navigating complex topics; there seems to be no time for reflection. This can be said of issues for contemporary Australia as diverse as the refugee crisis to the housing crisis and the terrorism crisis. The point is they’re all ‘crises’; more and more, we are accessing these subjects through the language of extremes; we are witnessing a growing propensity to shy away from deep and sensitive analysis. As, at its core, this is largely a problem with language-use and communication, it is unsurprising that one of its victims is a primary communicative tool: the book.

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